Aetna to Parents: When choosing a student health insurance, you should examine carefully

Aetna expressed its support and concern for the welfare of college students in terms of health care. Head of Aetna Student Health Kate Begley said, “At Aetna, we work closely with campus health and counseling centers, as well as community and travel service providers, to offer students access to convenient care at an affordable price, no matter where they are located.”
 
Most parents find summer the ideal time to ensure the academic and financial preparedness of college students for life on campus. This is also the time when vital decisions are made. What is often overlooked, however, is student health insurance. Aetna encourages parents to view a student’s health insurance options as one of the important considerations when they prepare their children for college education.
 
Kate Begley further said that they “support the efforts of colleges and universities to ensure students have access to affordable, quality health care.” Aetna also gave tips to parents who are in the process of selecting a student health insurance plan. These tips include weighing the option of carrying a dependent on one’s plan against the benefits of a school plan; identifying a health-care contact on campus by reviewing the school’s website and visiting the campus health center; and understanding the health insurance requirements of the school.
 
"Choosing a student health insurance plan that is right for your child is a personal decision and one that should be examined carefully, particularly in today's uncertain economy," added Begley. "Evaluating the true cost, meaning the premium plus out-of-pocket expenses, of a family plan versus a student health plan is critical to understanding which plan is most cost-effective and will best serve the needs of your college student."

Affordable Student Health Insurance—Go Online

There are still many students who do not have student health insurance, primarily because of poverty. Not all students are fully covered by scholarships and loans; they struggle just to finish their college education. These students are in need of affordable health insurance to protect them when the need for health care arises.
 
Some lucky students have parents who pay for their health insurance, but others do not. Regardless of whether a student is supported financially by parents or not, having health insurance is really a necessity. These days, living without insurance, especially insurance that covers the medical basics, is like courting financial disaster. This calls for affordable student health insurance.
 
In the light of the current financial uncertainties in our modern society, insurance companies have come up with some affordable solutions to really fulfill the need for individual health insurance in the education community. Thus, students can now focus on their studies and not worry about what will happen if or when sickness strikes them.
 
There are many things to consider when buying medical insurance. For instance, a student should want to know exactly what his or her plan covers. He or she should find out if the plan allows selecting a physician of his or her own choice. Other considerations include: the cost of the annual payments for the plan, reimbursements and the length of time these take, and even the company’s customer service (i.e., if the company offers 24-hour customer service). These considerations tip the balance in favor of going online to find affordable student health insurance. The websites of insurance companies provide complete, up-to-date information on the services they offer.

Applying for a Student Health Insurance Plan

Most of the universities and colleges in the U.S. require their full-time students to have a student health insurance plan. After taking time to carefully research all of his or her student health insurance choices, the concerned student should now be comfortable with a decision regarding which health care policy would best suit their needs. The next step, of course, is to file an application for enrollment in the desired health insurance plan.
 
If the student has chosen the student health insurance being offered by the university or college where he or she is studying, they may not need to apply. Most universities and colleges automatically enlist their full-time students in their student health insurance plan, if the student does not show proof of private health-plan coverage first.
 
Meanwhile, if the student has chosen a private student health insurance policy or individual health plan instead, he or she must submit an application, together with the premium payment. Most insurance companies require the premium payment upon application. The premium is fully refundable, of course, if the application is declined.
 
In the process of applying for a private health insurance plan, the applicant is asked a series of health-related questions. This will determine his or her eligibility and qualification for coverage, and also the risk factor. If the applicant is presently undergoing treatment for a serious injury or illness, the application may be declined. It is also of utmost importance to disclose all requested information honestly.
 
The applicant will also be asked to choose the effective date of coverage. Most insurance policies can be made effective immediately after application, but sometimes the processing can take weeks, so it is best to file the application early.
 

Benefits Covered by Student Health Insurance

Most of the primary universities and four-year colleges in the U.S. require their full-time students to have a student health insurance plan. A student has several available options in choosing the best health plan for him or her. Obviously, in order to determine which is best, he or she must make certain enquiries and be knowledgeable regarding the various student health plans being offered.
 
In researching the different options for student medical insurance, it would certainly be helpful to be familiar with the health care coverage that one should expect. Although the coverage of services and benefits vary depending on the insurance company, there are particular benefits that ought to be a part of all health insurance policies. Given that health insurance policies are regulated by the state, the state in which a student is attending college may impose particular requirements on all insurance companies. If the state has specific mandates, a student should clearly see these on the leaflet or brochure of the medical insurance policy he or she is considering.
 
Here is a list of some benefits that are commonly covered by most student medical insurance policies. The amount of the deductible and limits of coinsurance vary significantly, so those items are not addressed here.
 
Preventive health care (usually with maximums)
Visits and consultations with a physician
Hospital room and board
Outpatient prescription drugs (usually with maximums)
Inpatient prescription medication
Outpatient surgical procedures
Registered nurse fees
Anesthesiology
Ambulance
Durable medical equipment
Hospital intensive care
Lab and radiology
Psychotherapy (some states mandate this, usually with maximums)
Radiation and chemotherapy
Physiotherapy (usually with maximums)
 

College Students Need Health Insurance


For most people, going to college is a big adjustment in their lives. There are new things to learn, new people to meet, and more experiences to enjoy. Most young people look forward to graduating, while having fun in the process. However, there are also important things to consider, such as tuition fees and other expenses.
 
With all the hassles that college life brings, it is easy to neglect one’s health. Although young people are considered healthier than the rest of the population, there are studies showing that college students are also prone to accidents and health problems just like anyone else. In the US, about 1.7 million students are uninsured, meaning their medical expenses are paid with money from their pockets. This fact is aggravated by another finding which shows that some uninsured students do not seek medical help, due to the high costs of consultations and treatments. This kind of scenario could result in numbers of students dropping out of school due to illness or to get work to pay their medical bills.
 
In response to this problem, some colleges have begun to force students to acquire some form of medical coverage, while others offer affordable medical packages. Student health insurance plans are more flexible and have fewer requirements than traditional individual plans. In addition, some plans offered by colleges can be extended even after one’s graduation.
 
Medical insurance plans are also important to students covered by other people’s policies. Insured students are commonly covered under their parents’ policies which are offered by their parents’ employers. It is important to check the eligibility of students under their parent’s medical coverage; the coverage might be terminated due to certain factors, such as when a student reaches a certain age or has married.
 
For college students, health insurance is important in safeguarding their health, reducing future expenses, and improving their chances of graduating.


Emergencies
On Call International Students may also contact On Call International, which offers 24-hour worldwide medical assistance. SOS can provide referals for doctors or hospitals outside of the United States, coordinate payment with the provider, and coordinate medical evacuations and repatriations. Call the AT&T number listed on your insurance card, or call 1-603-898-9159 (call collect if necessary). On Call International can also be reached from Canada and the United States at 1-800-689-1896.

Exclusions and Limitations of Student Health Insurance

Most of the top universities and colleges in the U.S. require their full-time students to have a student health insurance plan. There are several options regarding health plans from which a student can choose. In order to choose well and make an informed decision, he or she must be knowledgeable regarding the ins-and-outs of student health insurance policies. One such important aspect is the limitations and exclusions of student health insurance plans.
 
All insurance companies that offer student health insurance will provide a student with a list of medical costs that are not included in the policy he or she is acquiring. Additionally, they will let the client know which of the covered benefits have limitations and what the limitations are. This information is easily accessible in the plan brochure and included in the “Exclusions and Limitations” section.
 
Here is a list of common exclusions in most student health insurance plans:
 
Pre-existing conditions (usually for a certain time period from the date of initial enrollment)
Acne treatment
Treatment of drug or alcohol addiction
Elective surgeries
Acupuncture
Non-severe mental illness
Self-inflicted injury or attempted suicide
Elective abortion
Dental and vision
Maternity
Congenital conditions
 
Additionally, here is a list of common limitations in most student health insurance plans:
 
Out-Patient prescription medications or drugs (usually there is a maximum yearly payable or a particular drug formulary)
Preventive health care
Repatriation
Prostate screening
Annual physical exams
Psychotherapy
Treatment of diabetes
Mammograms and pap smears
Emergency medical evacuation
Emergency dental

General Information
Regular attendance - The Community School expects students to attend school every day. Excessive absence (greater than 10%) will have an adverse effect on a student's mastery of academic material and may result in a student having to repeat specific courses or a year of school. Excused Absences are absences from school that cannot be avoided. They may result from illness, school-sanctioned field trips or school activities such as athletic team trips.

Graduates need to get health insurance

Aside from mortarboards, graduating college students have other things to think about.
 
A report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers estimated that this year, at least a million alumni pulled out from their parents’ health insurance coverage after graduating. Because of financial shortages, former college students are having a hard time getting replacement insurance policies.
 
According to Jon Gabel, graduates should go for health insurance plans offered by employers. The senior fellow from the University of Chicago’s Opinion Research Center—Health Policy and Evaluation Department also added that it is the most affordable health plan for fresh graduates.
 
But the thing is, landing a job in today’s struggling job market is difficult. NACE says that around 2.5 million fresh graduates are unemployed. Samantha Whiteside, a 24-year-old graduate of health and fitness from Virginia Polytechnic University, is one of them.
 
After graduating last year, she had a promising career outlook after getting a job in an outpatient rehabilitation center around March. She worked as a technician as well as a wellness instructor for seniors with mental illness. Her employer promised that she would get health insurance benefits after three months. However, she was fired three days before her fourth month began.
 
“I've never been in this situation before," she said. "I know everybody's been saying that the economy's bad … but I never thought it would happen to me."
 
She is currently working as a part-time swimming instructor. Marla Whiteside, her mother, got her an individual health insurance plan for $96 per month. Even though the plan would only cover 70% of hospital bills, it’s better than having no coverage at all.
 
According to Cheryl Fish-Parcham from Families USA, graduates should not be part of the uninsured population.
 

Graduates need to get health insurance

Aside from mortarboards, graduating college students have other things to think about.


A report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers estimated that this year, at least a million alumni pulled out from their parents’ health insurance coverage after graduating. Because of financial shortages, former college students are having a hard time getting replacement insurance policies.


According to Jon Gabel, graduates should go for health insurance plans offered by employers. The senior fellow from the University of Chicago’s Opinion Research Center—Health Policy and Evaluation Department also added that it is the most affordable health plan for fresh graduates.


But the thing is, landing a job in today’s struggling job market is difficult. NACE says that around 2.5 million fresh graduates are unemployed. Samantha Whiteside, a 24-year-old graduate of health and fitness from Virginia Polytechnic University, is one of them.


After graduating last year, she had a promising career outlook after getting a job in an outpatient rehabilitation center around March. She worked as a technician as well as a wellness instructor for seniors with mental illness. Her employer promised that she would get health insurance benefits after three months. However, she was fired three days before her fourth month began.


“I've never been in this situation before," she said. "I know everybody's been saying that the economy's bad … but I never thought it would happen to me."


She is currently working as a part-time swimming instructor. Marla Whiteside, her mother, got her an individual health insurance plan for $96 per month. Even though the plan would only cover 70% of hospital bills, it’s better than having no coverage at all.


According to Cheryl Fish-Parcham from Families USA, graduates should not be part of the uninsured population.



Health Coverage Options in College

As well as the usual considerations when entering college, prospective enrollees and their parents should check their insurance policies and providers to ensure that their health coverage will continue to be comprehensive and uninterrupted.
 
As colleges stress the importance of student health insurance they continue to create measures, such as requiring proof of health coverage, which prospective students must satisfy before being admitted. This gives students another question to think about before deciding to enroll in their college of choice, which colleges impose insurance requirements? From that point on, it’s all about considering different coverage options.
 
According to a report from the Government Accounting Office, 1.7 million college students in the U.S. do not have health insurance coverage. The report also reveals that students without coverage spent around $255 million in non-injury-related medical expenses in 2005.
 
Aside from requiring enrollees to provide proof of insurance coverage, many colleges are also offering coverage options via student health insurance plans. The GAO report estimated that around 60% of all the colleges in the country provide student health insurance.
 
Compared to individual health insurance plans, the eligibility requirements for student health plans are less restrictive. If students take advantage of the policies provided by their respective colleges they should automatically be qualified for coverage once they register as full-time students.
 
The only drawback of student health plans is the variation in benefits and cost. Coverage is very specific. That is why it is important to examine how any policy would deal with specific claims before deciding to buy coverage.
 

Health Insurance
a supplementary health insurance plan that pays for some medical expenses not covered by OHIP or UHIP. Full-time registered students are automatically covered. The present cost is $184.70 per full-time student per year (including Ontario tax), and is included in your GSU fee if you are eligible. Because it is a reimbursement plan, there is no membership card . We receive regular lists of full-time students from ROSI and these are used by the insurance company to verify eligibility. Coverage begins September 1 and remains in force until August 31 provided you have not been refunded your fees .

Health Insurance for College Students

College life is exciting for most students. For some, it will be their chance to live independently from their parents. Others may see it as an opportunity to set the course of their future career that will enable them to live the life that they have always dreamed of.
 
Maintaining a healthy mind and body is especially important to students who are attending college because of the tough academic-related deadlines and rigorous training that they face. Students who are physically, mentally and emotionally fit perform better in school than those who are often sick. Thus, it is logical for college universities to demand that their students have credible student health insurance or a health plan within their budget.
 
If you are a foreign student or a domestic student attending college in the United States, a student health insurance plan will provide you with medical coverage and protection, in case of emergency, until you finish your degree. Students can also opt to remain with their parents’ group health insurance plans. One of the advantages of obtaining private health insurance is that you can access medical services above that which your school can offer.
 
It is best to know the requirements of the school that you are attending to ensure that your preferred health service provider meets the minimum requirements of the school. To make sure that this is accomplished, research and seek advice from professionals to guide you in choosing a health insurance plan that will suit your needs and budget.
 

Health Insurance Needs for Students: Keeping Your Health Insurance after Moving Out

Students who are bound for college and are moving out of their parents’ house, but are still under the umbrella of their parents’ health insurance coverage, need to weigh their options regarding student health insurance cover. There are several options that should be considered to ensure that students remain insured even after moving out of the family home.
 
The first option is to stay on their parents’ health plan by remaining in school and letting it take care of any medical expenses they will incur. Parents can inquire with their agent about the scope of benefits that can be provided to their children. Most health insurance plans provide coverage for children aged 19-25 years old, allowing them to continue using their parents’ policies.
 
The next option would be to use the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). This helps students retain the student health insurance coverage their parents bought for them. For those over 25 years old still attending school, or those who have decided to stop studying after reaching 18 years old, losing their parents’ health insurance coverage is a likely possibility. However, they might be able to temporarily continue the health coverage their parents carry for them through the utilization of COBRA.
 
Another option for those who will be working soon is to try short-term health insurance coverage. For those who won’t be a student for a short time and therefore won’t be able to use COBRA, considering a short-term health insurance policy may be a wise decision. This will be advantageous for those who are expecting to get insurance through a job and are just looking for coverage that is inexpensive and short term.
 
The last option is to get an individual health insurance plan that will keep you permanently protected.

NUS launch free health care campaign
Campaign for free prescriptions!! Fed up with the endless costs associated with being a student? Feeling the stretch of that 6 every time your doctor prescribes you some medicine? NUS recognises that being a student is costly. New textbooks, hidden course costs, printing credits and library fines can mount up before you even start to think about the debt you're building up on your student loan. Prescription charges are yet another pull on your pocket and discriminate against those students who rely on medicine on a daily or weekly basis.

Preparing a college insurance plan

As one prepares to go to college, parents will usually have basic things on the checklist including, laptop, allowances, groceries and other things, but one should never forget to include health insurance.
 
Students will be more secure knowing they have medical insurance especially those who are more prone to catching illnesses like medicine students who are exposed to infectious diseases, or those who are likely to get injured from strenuous activities like athletes.
 
In selecting the most appropriate health insurance, it is important to check out the available options and compare it with others. Information is the best way to decide on the best coverage for anyone.
 
It would also help one sort out the best coverage by considering what the maximum value would be that one would be covered for; if there is any deductible; its cost and how it varies with different deductibles.
 
Deductibles should be one of the priorities when deciding on an insurance plan. A physician’s professional courtesy does not always cover the deductible and it’s something one cannot rely on.
 
Knowing whether there are any restrictions on which physicians to use, and what is beyond the insurance’s coverage are also some things to consider.
 
There are many insurance providers that accommodate students, and college student health insurance plans can be obtained in all states from a host of providers. Also, health insurance coverage differs by state.
 

Student Health Insurance


According to a report recently released by the Government Accounting Office, nearly 1.7 million college students are not insured. This is sad news because young Americans are also among those who are most likely to have medical emergencies.
 
The report also showed that back in 2005, the uncompensated, non-injury-related medical expenses reached between $120 million to $255 million. Recent reports even show that around two-thirds of uninsured young adults do not seek treatment because of its high cost.
 
Fortunately, colleges are willing to change these figures and recently, many colleges have done something about this, such as requiring proof of health insurance prior to enrollment.
 
While some colleges ask students for proof of health insurance when enrolling, there are also numerous colleges that offer coverage options through student health insurance. According to GAO, around 60% of colleges offer these health plans to students. Student health insurance is offered by 82% of four-year public colleges while 71% of four-year private colleges offer the said plans.
 
The eligibility requirements for availing student health plans are less restrictive compared to individual plans. If a student opts to take advantage of the student health insurance offered by his school, he should be qualified for coverage once he enrolls as a full-time student. There are even student health insurances that allow the insured to extend it even after graduation.
 
Student health insurance comes with different benefits and at different costs, so it is important to check the policy’s benefits first.
 


Student Health Insurance for Students Who Wish to Study Abroad

A student who wishes to obtain formal education abroad must secure a good health insurance policy. There are two types of health insurance policies a student might consider, international travel insurance and student insurance in the country where they plan to study. The type of insurance commonly bought in a student’s home country before they go abroad is international travel insurance. Student health insurance, on the other hand, allows a student to pay only a percentage of the medical expenses at the time when medical services are rendered. This medical cost is called co-pay.
 
For an international student who wishes to pursue full-time study, at least six credit hours in the United States, he or she must be at least 14 years of age but not older than 65. Such a student must be eligible to enroll or should have enrolled in one of the required courses. These courses are as follows: a formal university ELS program, Ph.D., master, bachelor or associate. Also, the student must be a holder of a J1 or F1 visa. Spouses and unmarried children aged 19 or below may be included in the health insurance policy.
 
There is also pre-existing-condition exclusion for a period of one year, which means that for a period of one year medical treatment required because of existing health problems will not be covered by the plan.
 
For US residents who wish to study abroad, the terms and conditions of student health insurance policy are similar, though the amount of coverage may be different, depending on the country.

STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE: WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

According to a recent government study, roughly two million American college students are uninsured and these students account for almost $300 million in uncompensated, non-injury related health expenses each year.  While young men and women are generally considered healthier than other demographic groups, they are also far more likely to need emergency medical care.  Furthermore, many uninsured college students simply choose not to seek necessary care or treatment because the expense is too great.  The issue is of such importance that some colleges now require prospective students to produce proof of adequate medical coverage as a condition of acceptance.  Luckily, there are several options for these students and their families.
Because so many colleges and universities require students to have medical insurance, most schools—both public and private—now offer health plans to new enrollees.  In fact, more than half of American colleges have some sort of medical insurance for students.  Eligibility requirements are less stringent than with private individual plans, coverage begins immediately upon full-time enrollment, and some plans even extend benefits for several months beyond graduation.  However, there are huge variations in cost and coverage depending on the school.  Some plans cover students only while they are on campus, and most suspend benefits when students are at home or travel abroad.
The majority of college students between ages 18 and 23 who do have medical insurance are covered under someone else’s plan—usually a parent or guardian.  The benefits of dependent medical insurance are that there is no interruption of coverage, the plan terms remain the same even though a student does not reside in the home full-time, and there are none of the restrictions imposed by school-sponsored health plans.  There are also drawbacks to this kind of coverage, though.  Most employer or union plans require students to be enrolled full-time, meaning that if a student drops below a certain minimum number of credit hours coverage could be suspended or terminated.  Many of these plans also have age limits when coverage automatically drops for dependents; this can present a challenge for students who plan to pursue advanced degrees following their undergraduate work.  Finally, married students are often excluded from coverage as dependents regardless of age or university enrollment status.
Other options include employer-sponsored medical insurance for students who work full time, private medical insurance plans purchased from an agent or provider, or state-sponsored plans like Medicaid.  In these cases, students can obtain coverage tailored to their specific needs and budget.  Complications can arise, though, for those with pre-existing medical conditions—many companies will deny coverage for these kinds of risk factors.  However, different plans have different guidelines and requirements so it pays to shop around even if coverage has been refused because of an existing condition.  Many state-sponsored risk plans offer medical insurance for those who have been denied by a private insurer because of a health condition.
No matter what, always carefully review the options, restrictions, benefits and costs thoroughly before committing to a plan.

Student Insurance Plan FAQ's
Student Health Insurance FAQs Q. Which students are automatically enrolled in student health insurance? A. All traditional students registered for at least 12 credit hours are automatically enrolled in and billed for student health insurance if they do not complete a hard waiver for by the deadline date. A copy of both sides of your current insurance card must be included with the waiver form. The final waiver deadline for fall is September 1. Q. How do I waive student health care insurance? A.

Wellness Quick Reference
Wheelock College Student Health Services (WCSHS) provides free basic care for all Wheelock College undergraduates (regardless of residency) and resident graduate students during periods when the College is in session. This care is porvided at Healthcare Associates (HCA), the adult primary care site at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital (BIDMC). The Student Health Center is closed during the summer. Students may be able to be seen at HCA using their personal insurance (either the Consolidated Plan, purchased through Wheelock College or through another health insurance plan).