Compare Short Term Health Insurance Plans

Required information for accurate health plan quotes

Compare Short Term Health Insurance Plans

What is short term health insurance?

Short term health insurance, also known as temporary health insurance, is a medical plan that can provide individuals and families healthcare coverage for a set period of time, typically from just 30 days up to 364 days of coverage, depending on individual state rules. Having a similar plan makeup as permanent individual health insurance, short term health insurance is structured to cover doctor office visits, hospitalization, emergency room care, and select lab tests. (Permanent, individual health insurance is also known as an Obamacare plan and sold on the federal or state marketplaces). Short term plans also have familiar permanent insurance terms like monthly premiums, deductibles, coinsurance, copays, and out-of-pocket maximums ;terms you would find on an Obamacare plan. An important and differentiating benefit on many short term health insurance plans is an open network, which is an all-access pass to see any doctor or hospital, not forcing you into a narrow, pre-dictated network of providers which can be common with Obamacare plans.

Why is short term medical insurance so much less expensive than Obamacare?

Most consumers are surprised when they learn that temporary health insurance costs nearly half the price of an Obamacare plan. Short term health insurance plans are less expensive because they exclude certain benefits such as maternity coverage and ongoing mental health coverage. Because of this, temporary health insurance plans do not meet the minimum benefit requirements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and do not cover consumers with health conditions that existed prior to purchasing the plan. This is why temporary, short term plans, cost 50% or less since consumers are not paying for full, permanent insurance. Short term health plans are meant for the “right now.”

What should I do if I am not eligible for a short term plan?

It is very easy to find out if you are eligible for short term health insurance, and the vast majority of consumers who apply for short term coverage are accepted for coverage. Short term health insurance applications generally have five to seven medical “knock-out” questions that determine eligibility, so it will take a minute or two to review and answer those questions. Insurance companies have different application requirements, so we recommend calling to speak with a licensed health insurance agent if you have questions regarding your eligibility.

How short term health insurance works

To buy a short term health insurance plan online, it’s important to first research and compare your options. Some health insurance marketers offer a variety of plans so do your analysis carefully. Things you might want to think about when looking for a short term medical plan include:

  • Doctor office copays: Are doctors office visits important to you?
  • Urgent Care copays: Do you have children and anticipate visiting an Urgent Care clinic during your coverage period?
  • Prescription drug benefits: Are you currently on medication?
  • Student-athlete accident benefits: If insuring a college student, do they play sports during the school year and might need extra protection beyond short term health insurance that does not cover intercollegiate or interscholastic sports?
  • Physical therapy benefits: Do you anticipate needing therapy in the future?
  • Preventive care or wellness benefits: Is it important to be able to see a doctor for a wellness check at least once a year?

Not all short term health plans offer one or all of these benefits, so shop wisely. Figure out what is most important to your health and wellbeing and then compare plans. Many websites have filter options so you can search for plans based on the monthly cost, deductible, insurance company and more. Using filters can help narrow down what you can afford and what type of coverage you need.

Open Network vs. PPO Plans

Some short term health plans have an all-access policy, meaning, you can see any doctor you wish because your medical claims are paid based on a percentage of Medicare’s scale for provider reimbursement. What this means is, if you visit a doctor, they would send in a claim to the plan’s administrator for payment. The administrator would, in turn, send the provider a fixed dollar amount based on Medicare’s payment scale to pay for the medical services incurred. This allows you to continue seeing your current doctor. To avoid any balance billing, you should confirm that the percentage of Medicare will be sufficient to pay the bill.

If the short term health plan has a PPO network, that means you have to find a doctor in the network so your medical claims are billed at the in-network price. You can typically go outside of the network, but there is no guarantee that the administrator would pay for your medical bill since you didn’t stay in-network (it will vary by plan). Some individuals like the assurance of having their medical bills paid by seeing in-network doctors. It all comes down to personal preference.

Application

If you decide to purchase a temporary health insurance plan after completing your comparison shopping, you will need to fill out an application for coverage. There are a few steps to getting approved.

Medical Questions

Health insurance companies are allowed to ask you medical questions when you apply for a short term health plan. The questions are asked to make sure you are the right candidate for this type of insurance. You will be asked if you have been denied insurance in the past due to a health condition. You will be asked if you have been advised by a doctor to have medical tests done and have not acted yet. You could also be asked if you have had specific medical issues in the past, such as cancer or hepatitis (as an example). The questions vary from company to company, but there are typically a handful of questions to answer before you can proceed with your application.

Coverage Durations

Depending on your state of residence, short term health insurance coverage durations can vary from a maximum of 90 days up to 364 days. Some states even let you enroll for up to nearly three years in a row (essentially three 364-day policies). How much temporary coverage do you need? Plan to be asked how long you need the temporary insurance coverage. The good news - if you are uninsured and sign up for 30 days of coverage, confident you will have a new job before the month is out, and your plans fall through, you can enroll in another policy. If you sign up for six-months of coverage but don’t need the coverage after month four, you can cancel your coverage anytime and won’t have to pay for all six months. Short term health insurance is flexible and can fit many different coverage needs.

Who short term health insurance is good for

Short term medical insurance can be an alternative solution for nearly anyone who has a temporary health insurance need to fill. Just a few types of life situations that can warrant a short-term health plan are:

  • Uninsured due to job loss
  • A more affordable alternative to COBRA
  • 60-90 day waiting period with new employer
  • Aging off parents health plan at 26 years
  • Early retirees who don’t yet qualify for Medicare
  • College students needing coverage during the school year
  • College graduates who don’t yet have a job
  • Life situation changes (marriage or divorce)
  • Entrepreneurs starting their own business
  • Small business owners who purchase their own insurance
  • People who do not qualify for the ACA Special Enrollment period

When can I enroll in a short term health insurance plan?

If you suddenly find yourself without health insurance, short term medical plans can be a solid solution, especially if you are outside of the ACA Open Enrollment period, which generally runs from November 1 to December 15 every year. If you become uninsured during the six-weeks of Open Enrollment, you should look at an ACA plan first. But if you are like most who become uninsured outside of the Open Enrollment period and don’t qualify for Special Enrollment period, temporary health insurance can get you covered the next day and stay with you through the coverage duration allowed or until you find another permanent healthcare solution.

What are additional differences between short term medical insurance and Obamacare (ACA plans)?

There are many structural similarities between temporary health insurance and Obamacare plans, but there are also many benefit differences. Here are a few to highlight:

  1. Short term health insurance plans are not required to meet the essential standards of Obamacare plans, which means short term medical plans are not required to cover the 10 essential benefits that all ACA plans must include. These benefits include things like maternity care, rehabilitation, substance abuse and more. Longer-term benefits typically are not needed when someone is only enrolling in a temporary plan for a few months, which is why many of these services are not included in short term coverage.
  2. Short term medical insurance can cost at least 50% less than Obamacare (ACA) plans. Depending on age and state of residence, some temporary health insurance plans can range up to 80% less. Why? It is because the coverage timeframe on temporary health plans is limited, and essential benefits are not required to be covered. Price differences apply to the ACA marketplace as well. Bronze plans only are required to pay for 60% of average medical services up to the max out of pocket limit, whereas Gold plans cover 80%. You pay less for Bronze than you do for Gold because of more cost shares like deductibles.(But still, individuals with major health conditions are advised to seek permanent health insurance through the ACA marketplaces.)
  3. You can get coverage in a short term health insurance plan as soon as the next day. Applying for an Obamacare plan can take days or weeks. You must prove your total household income and complete a much larger application. Plus, even if you enroll in an ACA plan during the Open Enrollment period, you have to wait 30 to 45 days for coverage to start. Short term health insurance in many cases offers coverage as early as the next day.
  4. Short term health insurance isn’t available in every state, but ACA plans are.

Don’t forget the extras

If you plan to have a short term health insurance plan for more than a month, you might want to consider other health insurance policies to round out your healthcare package of benefits. Many companies offer dental insurance or hospital indemnity insurance as supplements to short term medical coverage. Plans that cover other areas of the healthcare system could be good to have should an unexpected situation play out.

Short term medical insurance can be the right coverage at the right time

Temporary health insurance plans for the short term are not a bad thing. If you lose your health insurance coverage due to job loss, you have a limited income on top of being uninsured. Short term health coverage can provide some comfort during a stressful time, whether it’s unemployment, early retirement or not being able to access the Obamacare marketplace due to timing. Going without health insurance coverage is a financial risk. Being able to get affordable coverage when you need it the most is something that most can get behind.

Learn More About Short Term Insurance

  • healthinsurance.com health insurance options when you're too old to be on your parents' insurance plan, group of doors with one yellow door
    If you're turning 26 soon, it's time to think about your health insurance options. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), you can stay on your parents' health insurance plan until age 26, but it's up to you to find coverage afterward. And although there's a lot of information about health insurance, just knowing that you have a choice is the first step. Here are seven common questions that many young adults may have concerning their health insurance. 1. Does my insurance end when I turn 26? The Affordable Care Act (ACA) allows young adults to be covered under their parents’ policy until age 26. But if you're on your parents' insurance plan, your insurance may not automatically end when you turn 26 because there are some exceptions to this rule: The ACA requires most employers to provide coverage until the end of the month that you turn 26. Some plans may cover you until the end of the year in which you turn 26. Some states even extend coverage to age 30 or 31. Check out the National Council of State Legislatures website to see your state laws. 2. How long do I have to get insurance after I turn 26? Standard ACA plans have a set enrollment period each year, but adults age 26 have a special 120-day enrollment period. That means you can purchase a medical insurance plan either 60 days before you turn 26, or 60 days after. 3. What are my insurance options? The good news is you have several choices. Let's walk through each. 1.) Enroll in your employer's plan. If you have a job, an easy way to get insurance is to join a health insurance plan offered through your employer. If you're just landing a new job, though, it's important to note that there may be waiting periods before your health insurance kicks in. 2.) Join your spouse's plan. If you're aging off of your parents' insurance but are married, you may be able to join your spouse's health plan. Just ask your spouse’s employer to add you to the plan within 30 days of your loss of coverage under your parents' plan. 3.) Shop for a plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. You can compare and purchase ACA plans, also known as Obamacare plans. One perk of the Health Insurance Marketplace is that you can’t be denied coverage for having a pre-existing health condition. Costs for marketplace plans vary greatly, depending on your location and the level of coverage you need. Tax credits to help offset the plan's cost and make it more affordable are also available for those who qualify. 4.) Get a short-term health insurance plan. Short-term health insurance provides temporary benefits quickly, if you qualify. If your application is approved, your policy can begin as soon as the next day. Plus, short-term plans tend to be less expensive than other plan options (because they do not cover pre-existing conditions and do not offer the full range of benefits of Obamacare) and can last as little as 30 days, which can be useful when you have a gap in coverage. 4. Does an ACA plan make sense for me? ACA plans can be a good option for health insurance once a young adult has aged out of their parents' insurance. If you have a chronic health issue, are planning on becoming pregnant, need more health service options, or want the assurance of a plan with the 10 essential benefits, ACA plans may suit you well. By law, all ACA plans must offer 10 essential health benefits with no annual cap on the benefit amount: Ambulatory outpatient services Inpatient hospital services Maternity and newborn care Emergency care Prescription drugs Mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health services Rehabilitative and habilitative services Laboratory services Preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management Pediatric services, including oral and vision care (some variation state by state) 5. Does a short-term insurance plan make sense for me? Short-term health insurance, also known as temporary health insurance, is a medical plan that provides you with health insurance coverage for a set period - anywhere from one to 12 months, depending on individual state rules. Some states offer short term insurance plans while others don’t, so it's essential to compare what's offered in your specific area. The big thing to know is that a short-term health insurance plan is entirely different than an ACA plan. Think of a short term health insurance plan as an option outside of the ACA, not an alternative to an ACA plan. For example, short-term plans are not required to cover the 10 essential health benefits, but they may be a good transitional fit if you're aging out of your parents' insurance, maintaining good overall health, and aren’t sure where life is taking you next - whether it’s a getting new job, entering the gig economy, preparing for grad school, or backpacking across America. Short-term plans several common medical services for many young adults, such as: Hospitalization Emergency room visits Doctors/specialists visits X-rays Lab tests 6. What makes short-term health insurance plans so affordable? Short-term health insurance is usually more affordable than other insurance options because it covers fewer medical services. For example, most short-term plans don't cover maternity and newborn care, mental health services, or prescription drugs. Insurers offering these plans are also allowed to deny coverage to those with pre-existing conditions, which also keeps costs down. To better understand the costs and potential savings associated with short term health insurance plans, it's important to get familiar with the following terms: -Premium: the monthly amount you'll pay for your health insurance coverage. Short-term plans generally offer lower premiums than ACA-compliant plans, and you may have the option to choose a higher deductible plan with a lower premium. -Deductible: the amount that you have to pay towards your medical bills before your insurance company will contribute any money. -Copayment/Coinsurance: the percentage of your medical costs that you actually have to pay after hitting your deductible. Then, your insurance company will pay for the remaining percentage. So let's say your coinsurance amount is 20%: You'd pay 20% of the medical bill, while your insurance company will pay the remaining 80%. -Out-of-pocket maximum: the total out-of-pocket amount that your insurance plan requires you to spend your medical expenses each year. Once you have met this amount, your insurer will pay 100% of all your covered medical expenses up to the plan's annual benefit limit. An out-of-pocket expense is any medical service that you have to pay for with your money. Deductibles and copayments/coinsurance are considered out-of-pocket expenses, but your monthly premium is not. So if your plan does have an out-of-pocket maximum, you won't have to pay for any plan-covered medical services after you reach the set amount for your out-of-pocket expenses. Here's an example: If your plan has an out-of-pocket maximum of $8,000, you've reached your out-of-pocket maximum once you've contributed that exact amount: $8,000. From then on, your insurance company will pay 100% of any plan-covered medical services for the remainder of the plan year, up to your plan’s annual limit. So if you're going to your primary care doctor or hospitalized for a few days, you won't have to pay any additional money as long as the service is included in your coverage plan. 7. What's the best option for me? A few factors come into play such as plan costs, your health situation, and your specific healthcare needs. The bottom line: The best thing to do is to simply shop around and compare plans as you age out of your parents' insurance plan. Just be sure to read the fine print so you understand what's covered and what's not, as well as your deductible amount and how much you’ll pay out of pocket.
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  • healthinsurance.com health insurance options for college students, group of students studying and smiling
    If you're a college student, you have several health insurance options. While many students stay on their parents' health insurance plans, others opt for choices like student health insurance plans or short-term health insurance plans. When shopping around, the first step is to understand your school's health insurance requirements. As examples, they can vary depending on if you're a part- or full-time student, and they can also require you to be covered by a specific type of plan if you're enrolled and living on campus. This is mind, let's walk through some of your options. #1. Stay on your parents' plan By law, you have the right to stay on your parent's health insurance plan until you turn 26 years old. If you're on your parents' insurance plan through their jobs, your coverage will end the month of your birthdate. But if your parents purchased insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you will be covered until the end of the year. Marketplace plans are government-mandated insurance plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requirements for individual and family health plans. Keep in mind that there's a set "open enrollment period" when you can add or drop health insurance. The specific dates vary from year to year, but the open enrollment period usually begins in November and ends in December in most states. Note, some states offer extensions and allow individuals over age 26 to stay on their parent's insurance under certain conditions. Your state ACA marketplace can provide you with more information. #2. Enroll in an ACA plan The Affordable Care Act - also referred to as Obamacare - was signed into law by then-President Barack Obama in March 2010. It was enacted to ensure that every American has access to medical insurance, regardless of their medical history. As a college student, you have the option to compare plans and sign up for insurance coverage through the ACA Health Insurance Marketplace. Note, these plans are required to cover the 10 essential health benefits, so their level of coverage might be more extensive than some of the other options we're covering. As examples, an ACA plan might be a good choice if you have a specific medical condition like diabetes, or if you're pregnant or anticipate becoming pregnant. #3. Look for student health insurance options Another option for college students is a student health insurance plan offered through your college or university. These plans are generally inexpensive and offer a range of coverage options. You might even find this option appealing because it counts as a school associated fee, meaning it can be covered by student loans or other school funding. You can check out your school's website, or contact your school's financial aid department to find out if student health insurance is available. #4. Buy a short-term health insurance plan Short-term health insurance plans tend to attract college students because they typically have a lower premium than other health insurance options - a good fit for college students on a budget. But short-term plans can also have limited coverage. So if you're looking into a short-term plan, it's important to consider the full picture beyond the cost: Doctor office copays: Are doctors office visits important to you? Urgent care copays: Do you anticipate visiting an urgent care clinic during your coverage period? Prescription drug benefits: Are you currently on medication? Student-athlete accident benefits: If you're a college athlete, short term health insurance that does not cover intercollegiate sports? Physical therapy benefits: Do you anticipate needing therapy in the future? Not all short term health plans offer one or all of these benefits, though, so shop wisely. Depending on the plan, short-term health insurance provides coverage for preventive care, doctor visits, urgent care, and emergency care. And although many don't offer prescription drug coverage, they may offer prescription discount cards to help you with drug costs. Another important variable to weigh is whether or not you have a pre-existing health condition. If you do have one, you can be denied short-term health coverage. Though some short-term providers may allow you to buy a plan, but you'll have to pay out-of-pocket for any medical treatment you receive as a result of a pre-existing condition. And these additional out-of-pocket expenses coupled with the policy premium can quickly add up. In 2018, the Kaiser Family Foundation issued the following stats about short-term plans: 43% didn’t cover mental health services 62% didn’t cover substance abuse treatment 71% didn’t cover outpatient prescription drugs None of the plans covered maternity care So it's good to know the facts. But while short-term health insurance plans don't cover everything, they do have several benefits: There's no enrollment period. You can enroll at any time, and coverage can begin as soon as the next day. They have a flexible length of coverage. Your coverage period can range from one month to 364 days, with policy renewal of up to three years, depending on your state’s rules. They're a security blanket. Short-term plans will cover you in the event of an accident or illness, so you aren't faced with paying large medical bills out of pocket. They're widely accepted among health professionals. You should be able to find health professionals who accept short-term insurance plans. Some insurance carriers have a preferred network with special negotiated pricing and an extensive network of physicians. They offer choice. You can typically select providers and physician services you're already familiar with, depending on plan options. Some states even offer short-term health insurance for up to three years, so you may be able to lock in guaranteed renewability if the insurance company offers it. Short-term health insurance coverage can vary depending on age, state, and gender, so what works for one person may not be a good option for the next. Keep in mind that short-term health coverage is currently not offered in 10 states, but you can shop around to find other insurance plans are available in your area. Also, plan rules like coverage and renewal terms, coverage for pre-existing conditions, and coverage for specific medical services vary state-by-state, so getting a personalized quote is an important part of the process. Interested in getting a quote? Getting a quote is an easy, hassle-free task. For starters, you're not required to commit to a short-term health insurance plan when getting a quote, and there's no contract involved once you do apply. After answering a few basic questions, you'll learn about specific coverage options available in your area - a good tool especially if you're going to college out of state. Then, you should take time to look over the information, talk it over with your parents/family, and pick the plan that works for you. Choosing health insurance might be one of your first major financial decisions in life, so we're here to help you make an informed choice. Our plan comparison tool gives you the power to search for plan options and set filters based on the monthly costs, deductibles, and benefit maximums. Shop around to get the right coverage and price that works for you.
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  • healthinsurance.com health insurance options outside of Medicare for early retirees, senior couple sitting by the beach watching the pink sunset
    Early retirement is truly rewarding. After all, you've worked hard your whole adult life to achieve financial security. And now, you're ready to enjoy the years ahead - all on your own time. But with early retirement comes the reality that you no longer have health insurance through your employer. Plus, you're not yet eligible for Medicare. So now what? This dilemma happens all too often. But the good news is you can plan your retirement on your terms, thanks to a variety of health insurance options including short-term health insurance plans, otherwise known as temporary health plans. Choices to close the coverage gap There are a number of options available for early retirees who are still a few years short of qualifying for Medicare. 1. COBRA coverage In 1985, Congress passed the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, more commonly referred to as COBRA, which allows you to extend your current health care plan for a set amount of time. Most businesses pick up a large portion of the coverage cost for their current employees. But once you retire, you may be required to pay the full cost of the health plan, along with a 2% administrative fee. 2. Coverage through your partner or spouse If your spouse or partner is employed, you may be able to obtain coverage through their employer’s plan as long as your spouse or partner is already covered. Your spouse may also be a potential source of health coverage even if he or she is already retired. As long as they have retiree medical coverage, it’s possible you’ll be eligible for coverage under that plan as well. 3. Private insurance Another option is to purchase private insurance from an agent who’s local to you, or through professional organizations. You might be able to find some private exchanges that allow you to choose any number of qualified health plans from multiple carriers. 4. Short-term health insurance Early retirees can choose short-term health insurance plans to get medical benefits for accidents and illnesses. These plans are temporary insurance policies that offer major medical type of benefits. Short-term medical plans serve as options outisde of ACA plans because they don't cover the ten essential minimum benefits and pre-existing conditions. This makes them a more affordable option. Short-term plans can also give you coverage from one month to one year, with the option to renew the plan for up to three years, if needed (depending on the state). 5. Health insurance marketplace plan The Health Insurance Marketplace is another way to shop for ACA plans, also known as Obamacare plans, which can fit your needs if you're not yet eligible for Medicare. One perk of the Health Insurance Marketplace is that you can’t be denied coverage for having a pre-existing health condition. Costs for marketplace plans vary greatly, depending on your location and the level of coverage you need. Tax credits to help offset the plan's cost and make it more affordable are also available for those who qualify. What are the pros and cons of ACA plans? Any ACA plan must include these 10 essential health benefits: Ambulatory patient services (no hospital admittance) Emergency services Hospitalization (for surgical procedures and overnight stays) Pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care (before and after birth) Mental health and substance use disorder (includes behavioral health treatment) Prescription drugs Rehabilitative and habilitative services (includes devices) Laboratory services Preventive and wellness services Pediatric services (includes oral and vision) On the other hand, ACA plans can be every expensive if you do not qualify for a subsidy. In addition, many plans have narrow networks, so you should always double check that your preferred providers are included in the ACA plan you’re considering. What are the pros and cons of short-term health insurance? For starters, you'll have health insurance protection in the unexpected event of an accident or major illness. As with any choice, there are pros and cons to opting for a short-term health plan. Let's start with the pros: Flexible plan duration. The plan length can range anywhere from 30 to 364 days, and in some states you have the option to extend the plan for up to three years. This means you have a flexible plan option without committing yourself to a longer plan that can potentially overlap your Medicare coverage. Low premiums. Short-term plans offer streamlined benefits in the event of an unexpected accident or illness and the monthly premium reflects that it does not cover pre-existing conditions, pregnancy or mental health. Enroll any time. You can sign up year-round as opposed to waiting for an open enrollment window. And the cons: No coverage for pre-existing conditions. Short-term health insurance policies are underwritten for risk, which means you can potentially be denied coverage if you have a pre-existing health condition such as diabetes or cancer. Limits on the number of covered doctor visits. Limits on prescription drug coverage. No coverage for maternity. With these pros and cons in mind, here are five examples where choosing short-term health insurance may make sense: You lost a job that provided insurance through your employer and can't afford COBRA. You started a job that has a waiting period before you’re eligible for company benefits, including health insurance. The ACA open enrollment period has passed and you are not eligible for a special enrollment period. You want affordable, temporary insurance to see you through a transition (e.g. moving from employed to self-employed) until you are more settled You retired early and don’t yet qualify for Medicare. Non-insurance alternatives There are some non-insurance alternatives that early retirees use such as: Health-sharing ministries A health-sharing ministry is not health insurance. It is a collective where members - typically those that share the same religious beliefs - make monthly payments to cover expenses of other members. In other words, it's a way to help pay for unexpected medical expenses by sharing the costs with others in your plan. Here’s how it works: Each member pays a specified monthly fee. Once their medical bills exceed a specific cost, the additional expenses are shared by the group members in the ministry using the funds paid into the pool via monthly fees. It's important to pay attention to the details, just as you would with any health plan. For example, some plans may have an eligibility time frame that lasts through your first year of membership, while others might not cover any pre-existing conditions. Read the fine print. It is especially important that you understand that unlike insurance, there are no governmental guarantees in place to ensure incurred medical expenses are paid. Direct primary care Direct primary care is another alternative for those with gaps in their coverage. Here’s how it works: Each patient pays a monthly membership fee, which covers basic primary care services with convenient access to their doctors. The fee amount ranges and depends on the scope of services covered. Often referred to as concierge medicine, direct primary care doctors can offer specific benefits to their patients that a typical insurance-based doctor can't, including same-day visits, 24-hour availability, low waiting room times, and even house calls. But there are also potential pitfalls to using direct primary care. Doctors tend to limit the amount of patients they see because they're often dedicated to spending more time with patients. And out-of-pocket expenses for patients can be higher under this model, which tends to attract only those who can afford this type of concierge care. Remember this is not an insurance plan and generally does not cover anything beyond primary care. The bottom line Though we just covered a variety of options, you don't have to go it alone as an early retiree. Why spend your free time doing hours of research? Compare plans or talk to an insurance agent to make an informed choice.
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ACA DISCLAIMER

SHORT TERM HEALTH INSURANCE, INDEMNITY INSURANCE , SUPPLEMENTAL INSURANCE AND CANCER INSURANCE ARE INSURANCE OUTSIDE OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (OBAMACARE). THESE PRODUCTS TYPICALLY DO NOT COVER PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS AND DO NOT INCLUDE ALL TEN OF THE MINIMUM ESSENTIAL BENEFITS OF OBAMACARE. INDEMNITY, SUPPLEMENTAL AND CANCER INSURANCE ARE DESIGNED TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL BENEFITS TO MAJOR MEDICAL INSURANCE.